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This is absolutely incredible. I don't see any flaws, it's looks perfect. It's so menacing, so frightening, and outright intimidating. ...

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Literature
InGen Carnivore Profile: Spinosaurus
InGen Carnivore Profile:
Spinosaurus



Name Meaning: Spine Lizard
Nickname: Spino
Timeline: Early-Late Cretaceous (112-93.5 mya)
Diet: Carnivore/Piscivore
Family: Orionides, Megalosauroidea, Megalosauria, Spinosauridae
Length: 49.2 feet long
Height:  14 feet tall
Weight:  6 to 10.5 tons
Range:  Isla Sorna
Description
If there's one predator strong enough to challenge Tyrannosaurus, Spinosaurus is the one and only theropod known to have fought and killed one. According to some old notes centering around the process of it's recreation, the body build of the Spinosaur specimens recreated by InGen are results of genetic alterations being done to the DNA, thus leading to their terrestrial theropod physique rather than that of the original creature they were cloned from. Lots of d
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Literature
InGen Island File: Isla Grande
InGen Island File:
Isla Grande
History
Following the disastrous failure of the most recent park on Nublar, Jurassic World, recently hired geneticist and prehistory enthusiast, Sam Lanser, saw this as an opportunity to start anew. Going to the board of directors, Sam immediately went about explaining how they should instead authorize for a more steady paced, money saving solution to make up for the Masrani Global Corporation's inability to maintain full control of the company's financial funds after money was wasted due to the park being shut down. 
Lanser suggested that Isla Nublar should instead be used as a wildlife preserve where the dinosaurs are allowed to live out their lives naturally, an idea previously proposed by Laura Sorkin and rejected by the board years ago. He also went on to suggest the introduction of more dinosaurs and other prehistoric fauna to the rest of the Five Deaths, along with purchasing another, more bigger island called Isla Gran
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Literature
InGen Carnivore Profile: Abelisaurus
InGen Carnivore Profile:
Abelisaurus

Name Meaning: Abel's Lizard
Nickname: Abel
Timeline: Late Cretaceous (80 mya)
Diet: Carnivore
Family:  Averostra, Ceratosauria, Abelisauria, Abelisauridae, Carnotaurinae
Length: 24.3 feet long
Height: 7 feet tall
Weight: 2 tons
Range: Isla Muerta
Description
Next to the more popular and recognizable Carnotaurus, Abelisaurus makes it mark as one of InGen's largest Abelisaurs. While it isn't the biggest predator, it still earns itself a spot in Muerta's food chain as one of the island's top predators, as well as one of the most active in open fields. It hunts just about anything that moves, including sauropods, ornithopods and whatever it can catch.
Habitat
Abelisaurus can most commonly be found scouting through the open plains, but will often travel to beaches and up to the valleys to
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Literature
InGen Carnivore Profile: Coelophysis
InGen Carnivore Profile:
Coelophysis



Name Meaning: Hollow Form
Nickname: Coelo
Timeline:  Late Triassic-Early Jurassic (203-196 mya)
Diet: Carnivore/Insectivore
Family: Neotheropoda, Coelophysidae
Length: 10 feet long
Height: 4 feet tall
Weight: 44 lbs
Range: Isla Sorna
Description
One of if not the most successful species of theropods to ever live, managing to make it all the way from the Late Triassic to the Early Jurassic. Coelophysis may be small and primitive, but one should not immediately judge this dinosaur by it's appearance, for it's behavior is what many should be mindful of. Not only are Coelophysis violent when feeling threatened, but in groups, they can even fend off predators such as raptors with limited effort.
Habitat
Coelophysis lives in the North region of Isla Sorna, being found more commonly around the sandy beaches and
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Literature
InGen Carnivore Profile: Alioramus
InGen Carnivore Profile:
Alioramus

Name Meaning: Different Branch
Nickname: Alio
Timeline: Late Cretaceous (70 mya)
Diet: Carnivore
Family: Orionides, Avetheropoda, Coelurosauria,Tyrannosauroidea, Tyrannosauridae, Tyrannosaurinae, Alioramini
Length: 20 feet long
Height: 7 feet tall
Weight: 1 ton
Range: Isla Tacano, Isla Grande
Description
Alioramus may be smaller and lesser known than it's more bigger cousins, but there's more to this theropod than meets the eye. It's gracile build gives it an edge in pursuing smaller and faster prey over long distances, with it's speed also providing a means of escape from bigger predators. The type species, A.remotus thrives on Isla Tacano while the other species A.altai thrives on Isla Grande.
Habitat
On Tacano, Alioramus commonly resides in the upland and mountain environments, but sometimes ventures out into the more open a
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Literature
InGen Carnivore Profile: Hyaenodon
InGen Carnivore Profile:
Hyaenodon

Name Meaning: Hyena Tooth
Nickname: Razor Jaws
Timeline: Late Eocene to Early Miocene (42-15.9 mya)
Diet: Carnivore
Family: Creodonta, Hyaenodonta, Hyaenodontidae
Length: 10 feet long
Height: 100 cm tall at the shoulder
Weight: 1,100 lbs
Range: Isla Pena
Description
Despite the meaning that it's name represents, Hyaenodon should not be mistaken for a primitive hyena nor should it be considered a cousin of hyenas themselves. What gave the creature it's name are it's teeth, which can deliver quite a nasty bite to anyone unfortunate enough to encounter one. The largest species, H.gigas, is truly as deadly as observers say it is. While not the biggest predator on Isla Pena, it certainly does well as an effective hunter, relying on the traditional method ambush to bring down it's prey.
Habitat
Hyaenodon preferably prowls ar
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Literature
InGen Carnivore Profile: Majungasaurus
InGen Carnivore Profile:
Majungasaurus


Name Meaning: Majunga Dome
Nickname: Majunga
Timeline:  Late Cretaceous (70-66 mya)
Diet: Carnivore
Family: Averostra, Ceratosauria, Abelisauria, Abelisauridae, Majungasaurinae
Length: 23 feet long, 26 foot specimens have been rumored, but never seen
Height:  6 feet tall
Weight: 2,400 pounds
Range: Isla Muerta
Description
This mid-sized abelisaur may not be as popular or beloved as it's more famous cousin Carnotaurus, but it certainly doesn't go unnoticed by observers. What it lacks in speed and agility, it more than makes up for with jaw power. Living on Isla Muerta, it can be found hunting prey slower than itself, with sauropods being it's most favorite victims.
Habitat
Majungasaurus preferably ventures through Muerta's coniferous forests during the day, but can also be spotted sleeping in
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Literature
InGen Carnivore Profile: Monolophosaurus
InGen Carnivore Profile:
Monolophosaurus

Name Meaning: Single Crested Lizard
Nickname: Monolo
Timeline: Middle Jurassic (165 mya)
Diet: Carnivore
Family: Neotheropoda, Averostra, Tetanurae
Length: 18 feet long
Height: 6 feet tall
Weight: 475 kg
Range: Isla Sorna
Description
People who see this theropod walking around from afar may sometimes mistake it for Dilophosaurus due to it's similar looking crest. But try to get closer and you may wind up seeing the difference before it runs away or attacks you. Despite the slight resemblance, there is enough distinction between Dilophosaurus and Monolophosaurus to further classify them as being unrelated. In regards to it's behavior, it can be aggressive when threatened, hungry or startled.
Habitat
Monolophosaurus lives in the North region of Isla Sorna, thriving within the lush jungles and on the savannas of said region.
B
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Yoshi's Rage Unleashed! by MegaSpinosaur Yoshi's Rage Unleashed! :iconmegaspinosaur:MegaSpinosaur 4 2
Literature
InGen Carnivore Profile: Tyrannosaurus
InGen Carnivore Profile:
Tyrannosaurus
 


Name Meaning:  Tyrant Lizard King
Nickname: T.rex
Timeline: Late Cretaceous (68-66 mya)
Diet: Carnivore
Family: Orionides, Avetheropoda, Coelurosauria,Tyrannosauroidea, Tyrannosauridae
Length: 40 feet long, though the mysterious Tyrannosaurus "Canyon" Rex reaches up to only 33 feet
Height:  12 feet tall
Weight: 8.4 tons, Canyon Rex weight is up to 5 tons
Range: Isla Sorna, Isla Nublar, Isla Tacano, Isla Grande
Description
Being one of the most feared and powerful theropods ever seen, Tyrannosaurus Rex is considered legendary for it's strength, ferocity and bite force which goes unrivaled by all other land predators. While not the biggest of InGen's carnivorous dinosaurs, it is still one of the most dangerous. Hadrosaurs are often the favored p
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Literature
InGen Carnivore Profile: Dimetrodon
InGen Carnivore Profile:
Dimetrodon

Name Meaning: Two Measures Tooth
Nickname: Dimetro
Timeline: Permian (295-272 mya)
Diet: Carnivore
Family: Synapsida, Pelycosauria, Sphenacodontia, Sphenacodontoidea, Sphenacondontidae
Length: 15 feet long
Height: 1.5 meters
Weight: 551 lbs
Range: Isla Muerta, Isla Grande
Description
Some called it a dinosaur, yet this identification was false. Dimetrodon is not a dinosaur nor does it share any family connection to dinosaurs at all. Instead, Dimetrodon is a type of mammal-like reptile related to modern mammals, despite not looking like much. It's appearance alone is frightening, but at 15 feet long, Dimetrodon angelensis could send chills down a person's spine. It's razor sharp teeth and ambush tactics make it an effective predator of small prey, though it will also scavenge if need be. They can be found thriving mainl
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Literature
InGen Carnivore Profile: Herrerasaurus
InGen Carnivore Profile:
Herrerasaurus

Name Meaning: Herrera's Lizard
Nickname: Herrera
Timeline: Late Triassic (231.4 mya)
Diet: Carnivore
Family: Saurischia, Herrerasauridae
Length: 20 feet long
Height: 7 feet tall
Weight: 350 kg
Range: Isla Muerta, Isla Nublar 
Description
This early dinosaur may be one of the most basal out of InGen's recreated carnivores, but it certainly is no wimp despite it's size. Herrerasaurs are not only fast, but also surprisingly strong for carnivores of their size, tackling prey items even bigger them themselves at times, especially in packs. While not the biggest predators on Isla Muerta, they are one of the most common. However, their sightings on Isla Nublar have yet to be mentioned.
Habitat
Herrerasaurus commonly lurks through the dense jungles of Isla Muerta, using the shade of the trees for cover when conducting ambushes on t
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Literature
InGen Carnivore Profile: Utahraptor
InGen Carnivore Profile
Utahraptor

Name Meaning: Utah's Hunter
Nickname: U-raptor
Timeline: Early Cretaceous (126 mya)
Diet: Carnivore
Family: Coelurosauria, Maniraptora, Pennaraptora, Paraves, Dromaeosauridae, Eudromaeosauria
Length: 23 feet long
Height:  6 feet tall
Weight: 500 kg
Range: Isla Sorna
Description
If people thought that Velociraptor was bloodthirsty, then clearly they haven't met it's bigger and more violent cousin. With an appetite and aggression similar to InGen's larger theropods, Utahraptor is a truly dangerous carnivore. Being the largest dromaeosaur of all time, a single Utahraptor is deadly enough on it's own, but a pack is like a nightmare waiting to unfold. While not quite as fast and agile as it's smaller cousins, Utahraptor can still outpace most types of prey. Two varieties are seen to exist on Isla Sorna, with the accurately
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Throcktar: Dragon of Light by MegaSpinosaur Throcktar: Dragon of Light :iconmegaspinosaur:MegaSpinosaur 3 0
Literature
InGen Carnivore Profile: Tarbosaurus
InGen Carnivore Profile:
Tarbosaurus

Name Meaning: Alarming Lizard
Nickname: Tarbo
Timeline: Late Cretaceous (70 mya)
Diet: Carnivore
Family: Orionides, Avetheropoda, Coelurosauria,Tyrannosauroidea, Tyrannosauridae
Length: 39 feet long
Height:  12 feet tall
Weight: 5 tons
Range: Isla Sorna, Isla Tacano
Description
Those who mistake Tarbosaurus for Tyrannosaurus at first sight would immediately be proven wrong by scientists who know them most. Despite the similarities in size and appearance, Tarbosaurus can be distinguished from Tyrannosaurus by it's color patterns and it's vocals, which are said to be more lower pitched. While initially living only on Isla Sorna in the North and South regions, InGen immediately had to relocate a large number of the Northern Tarbosaurs to Isla Tacano based on shocking reports of male and females crossbreeding with Tyrannosaurus. Th
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Literature
InGen Carnivore Profile: Velociraptor
InGen Carnivore Profile:
Velociraptor
 

 
Name Meaning: Swift Seizer
Nickname: Raptor
Timeline: Late Cretaceous (75-71 mya)
Diet: Carnivore
Family: Coelurosauria, Maniraptora, Pennaraptora, Paraves, Dromaeosauridae, Eudromaeosauria
Length: 6 to 13 feet long
Height: 2 to 6 feet tall
Weight: 80 to 150 kg
Range: Isla Sorna, Isla Nublar
Description
Anytime scientists or observers want to scare one another, they tell stories about Velociraptor. Infamous from the get go, Velociraptor lives up to it's reputation as being one of the most vicious predators around. With speed and intelligence on their side, these theropods alone are deadly in their own right. While a lone raptor is a danger to small sized herbivores, packs are known to be a major threat to larger ones. According to sightings on Sorna, two
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Activity


InGen Carnivore Profile:

Spinosaurus

Dc Card Spino4 Big by MegaSpinosaur



Dc Card Spino3 Big by MegaSpinosaur

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Name Meaning: Spine Lizard

Nickname: Spino

Timeline: Early-Late Cretaceous (112-93.5 mya)

Diet: Carnivore/Piscivore

Family: Orionides, Megalosauroidea, Megalosauria, Spinosauridae

Length: 49.2 feet long

Height:  14 feet tall

Weight:  6 to 10.5 tons

Range:  Isla Sorna

Description

If there's one predator strong enough to challenge Tyrannosaurus, Spinosaurus is the one and only theropod known to have fought and killed one. According to some old notes centering around the process of it's recreation, the body build of the Spinosaur specimens recreated by InGen are results of genetic alterations being done to the DNA, thus leading to their terrestrial theropod physique rather than that of the original creature they were cloned from. Lots of dinosaurs actively fear this giant, even some theropods are intimidated by it's ferocity. According to paleontologist Alan Grant, it's roars are said to be even bigger than those of Tyrannosaurus.

Habitat
In the North region of Isla Sorna, Spinosaurus can be more commonly found living around wetlands such as Marshes, being usually found near the deeper waters of the area. When moving inland, they usually wander up to the open areas such as plains, grasslands and floodplains, along with visiting watering holes and swimming up through rivers. A more minimal population of Spinosaurus is known to thrive in the Mangroves, along with another lesser known population living in the Northeast.


Behavior

Based on a Spinosaurus attack which took place on Sorna in the year 2001, the InGen bred Spinosaurus are known to be extremely aggressive. They are solitary by nature and do not hunt in packs. Males will fight each other for the best hunting grounds in the wetlands, with the loser being driven away and forced to hunt elsewhere.

In the mating season, males attract mates by flashing their colorful sails. Once paired up, they will mate for a couple of weeks until the eggs are laid, after which both parents will watch over the nest. Once the eggs hatch, the male is driven away by the female. Young spinosaurs are then cared for by their mother, who provides them with food and protection. But after coming of age, juveniles are cast out by the mother and sent off on their own.

The individual Spinosaur encountered by Alan Grant and the other survivors in 2001 was shown to not only be extremely dangerous, but also highly persistent due to launching repeated attacks on them throughout the encounter.

To this day, Spinosaurus is strongly feared by anyone who encounters it, including observers who take caution when studying the theropod.


Hunting

Referred to as a superpredator by Billy Brennan, the Spinosaurs on Sorna are seen as being both semi-aquatic fish eaters and terrestrial hunters. They hunt for fish in the deeper waters of the wetlands, using their long, croc-like jaws to snag the closest fish that comes in range. Next to still preying on the sawfish Onchopristis like the real animal, Spinosaurus will also prey on other aquatic animals such as small mosasaurs.

When hunting land based prey, Spinosaurus utilizes a hunting style similar to crocodiles by lurking near the edge of rivers to ambush unsuspecting herbivores. In a croc-like fashion, it will lunge out of the water and grasp the prey in it's jaws. But in other cases, it will actively hunt on land like traditional theropods.

Given it's size, Spinosaurus can hunt a large variety of prey depending on it's availability. It most commonly hunts ornithopods, with frequent targets being Edmontosaurus, Corythosaurus, Parasaurolophus, Maiasaura, Hypacrosaurus, Gryposaurus, Lambeosaurus, Iguanodon, Tenontosaurus, Saurolophus, Ouranosaurus, Tsintaosaurus and sometimes Shantungosaurus. 

From time to time, Spinosaurus will also target other prey like ceratopsians, stegosaurs and therizinosaurs, all the while staying away from large sauropods.

Based on live observation, Spinosaurus can kill it's prey in different ways. When attacking from the water, it bites down on the back of the prey and slashes it with it's claws to severely wound it before releasing it to let it die from blood loss. When hunting by land, it will charge forth and knock the prey down, pinning it with it's foot before delivering a neck bite. However, according to a live recording of a hunt involving a male Spinosaurus attacking a Shantungosaurus, said theropod was shown killing the hadrosaurid by clamping it jaws and large arms onto it's neck and twisting it.


Interspecific Competition

In the Marshes, Spinosaurus is known to coexist with it's smaller cousin, Baryonyx. However, competition is largely limited, with Baryonyx hunting for fish in the shallow waters while Spinosaurus occupies the deeper waters. But more recently, shocking reports of adult Baryonyx fighting Spinosaurus have become known, with the main cause stemming from Spinosaurus attacks on young Baryonyx, which spurs the wrath of angry parents.

When thriving inland, Spinosaurus is the largest theropod on the island overall. Small and medium theropods such as raptors and Ceratosaurs show respect to this giant carnivore and do not get in it's way. Whereas large theropods like Carcharodontosaurus, Saurophaganax and Torvosaurus are the only known theropods who will stand their ground against Spinosaurus.

But according to further observation, the number one greatest enemy of Spinosaurus is Tyrannosaurus. The two theropods constantly compete for prey and will often clash over carcasses. Fights between these enormous predators can be especially fatal, based on an incident in which a young sub-adult Tyrannosaurus fought and lost to a Spinosaurus after the latter had snapped it's neck. Full grown tyrannosaurs are known for being capable of actively killing a Spinosaurus when gaining the upper hand in a fight. 






InGen Carnivore Profile: Spinosaurus
And here it is, the largest therpod to ever appear in the Jurassic Park franchise, the theropod who upstaged Tyrannosaurus in the third film. Now that I look back on the fight scene between T.rex and Spinosaurus in Jurassic Park III, I admit that back then I was as angry as anyone about seeing one of my top favorite theropods get killed. But after doing some further digging in my research, it turns out that the main reason the Spinosaurus was so powerful in the movie is not because the Tyrannosaurus was weaker, but because the Spinosaurus was genetically altered by the InGen scientists who first brought it to life, thus being the reason behind it's terrestrial anatomy, incredible strength and frightening ferocity. It was also mentioned that the Spinosaur's creation is what paved the way for InGen to create genetically engineered dinosaurs, including the notorious hybrid, Indominus Rex.

And upon doing some deeper research out of curiosity, it finally dawned on me as to how this Spinosaurus became the way it is. 

It's all because of one guy. The very same guy who created the Indominus Rex.

Those who saw Jurassic World should know the "guy" I'm talking about.

Behold, this YouTube video which explains a little bit more about Jurassic Park III's Spinosaurus: 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=gT4Spo…

But enough ranting aside, tune in next time for another profile.

Jurassic Park/World and InGen belong exclusively to Universal Studios.
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InGen Island File:

Isla Grande



History

Following the disastrous failure of the most recent park on Nublar, Jurassic World, recently hired geneticist and prehistory enthusiast, Sam Lanser, saw this as an opportunity to start anew. Going to the board of directors, Sam immediately went about explaining how they should instead authorize for a more steady paced, money saving solution to make up for the Masrani Global Corporation's inability to maintain full control of the company's financial funds after money was wasted due to the park being shut down. 

Lanser suggested that Isla Nublar should instead be used as a wildlife preserve where the dinosaurs are allowed to live out their lives naturally, an idea previously proposed by Laura Sorkin and rejected by the board years ago. He also went on to suggest the introduction of more dinosaurs and other prehistoric fauna to the rest of the Five Deaths, along with purchasing another, more bigger island called Isla Grande in order to keep Isla Sorna from becoming too overpopulated. While the board was initially opposed to the idea, they eventually relented once Lanser had told them this suggestion would prove beneficial in the near future as it would allow them to save their money for a much better park that will capitalize on Jurassic World's downfall.

Months later, after negotiations with the Costa Rican government and United Nations proved successful, Isla Grande was bought by InGen. In following year of 2016, InGen's geneticists, under the supervision of Sam, began working on recreating various prehistoric animals and shipping them over to the island.

Since then, the animals have continued to thrive without harm from any outside threats. Many illegal expeditions conducted by big game hunters and poachers have been attempted, but all have been stopped. In addition, to keep a closer eye on the welfare of their animals, InGen has often sent wildlife observation teams to Grande to study and record them in their island ecosystem.


Location and Geography

Located about 330 miles away from the Five Deaths and the infamous Isla Nublar, Isla Grande earns it's name due to it's large and widespread size, being even bigger than Isla Sorna in comparison.

Compared to the geographies of the Five Deaths and Nublar, Isla Grande, while still being mountainous, has a wide array of habitats, such as dense and tropical jungles, wetlands, rivers, lakes, savannas, plains, floodplains, watering holes, shrublands, valleys, swamps, badlands, grasslands, forests, woodlands and canyon-like rocky terrains. Caves are also known to be found in the rocky terrains, forests and woodlands from time to time. 

Similar to the other six islands, Grande also has coastal caves and sandy beaches.

The warm and tropical weather of the island often makes it susceptible to occasional rain storms and monthly dry seasons which also cause droughts. 


Ecology

Isla Grande is home to a wide variety of fauna recreated by InGen, including some from the Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic eras. 

While dinosaurs are the most commonly seen fauna, mammals and reptiles, along with birds and amphibians also live around the island. The seas that surround the island serve as the prominent habitat for numerous water based fauna including fish, marine reptiles and even prehistoric whales.

In regards to the carnivores, Tyrannosaurus dominates at the top of the food chain as the main apex predator of the island, while predators such as Suchomimus, Gorgosaurus, Megalania, Dryptosaurus and many others each occupy their own niches.

On the other hand, giant herbivores like sauropods and Paraceratherium have the advantage of feeding on trees, all the while leaving the grass and low growing vegetation to herbivores who restrict themselves to feeding at that level, thus displaying herbivore niche partitioning. 

Flocks of pterosaurs can also be found flying throughout the skies.

Migrations are known to occur on Grande from time to time, usually in dry seasons and droughts when food and water become less abundant for the herbivores. On other occasions such as breeding season, herds of herbivorous dinosaurs travel long distances to reach their traditional nesting grounds.



Fauna
  


Theropods

Tyrannosaurus (apex predator)
Gorgosaurus 
Suchomimus
Alioramus
Eustreptospondylus
Dryptosaurus
Siamotyrannus
Marshosaurus
Fukuiraptor
Alectrosaurus
Oviraptor
Rapator
Ornithomimus
Gallimimus
Struthiomimus
Ingenia
Deinocheirus
Pelecanimimus
Archaeornithomimus
Nothronychus
Erlikosaurus
Compsognathus
Irritator
Yutyrannus (recently added)
Guanlong (recently added)

Ornithopods:

Dryosaurus
Valdosaurus
Thescelosaurus
Rhabdodon
Camptosaurus
Brachylophosaurus
Fukuisaurus
Edmontosaurus
Shantungosaurus
Iguanodon
Muttaburrasaurus
Tenontosaurus
Parasaurolophus
Corythosaurus
Bactrosaurus
Atlascopcosaurus
Gryposaurus
Hypacrosaurus
Agilisaurus
Lurdusaurus
Altirhinus
Hypsilophodon
Othnielia
Parksosaurus
Prosaurolophus


Ceratopsians:

Triceratops
Styracosaurus
Pachyrhinosaurus
Pentaceratops
Protoceratops
Avaceratops
Chasmosaurus
Torosaurus
Einiosaurus
Leptoceratops
Microceratus
Psittacosaurus
Nasutoceratops

Sauropods/Prosauropods:

Alamosaurus
Diplodocus
Mamenchisaurus
Shunosaurus
Camarasaurus
Ampelosaurus
Jobaria
Omeisaurus
Bellusaurus
Massospondylus
Mussaurus
Plateosaurus
Riojasaurus
Dicraeosaurus
Nigersaurus


Ankylosaurs:

Euoplocephalus
Polacanthus
Edmontonia
Gastonia
Saichania
Ankylosaurus
Gargoyleosaurus
Sauropelta

Stegosaurs:

Stegosaurus ungulatus
Kentrosaurus
Wuerhosaurus
Tuojiangosaurus


Pachycephalosaurs:

Pachycephalosaurus
Homalocephale
Prenocephale


Pterosaurs

Pteranodon
Rhamphorhynchus
Dimorphodon
Peteinosaurus
Tropeognathus


Crocodilians:

Sarcosuchus
Deinosuchus
Kaprosuchus
Nundasuchus
Prestosuchus
Dakosaurus
Metriorhynchus
Geosaurus


Mosasaurs:

Mosasaurus
Hainosaurus
Plotosaurus
Platecarpus


Pliosaurs:

Pliosaurus
Liopleurodon
Leptocleidus
Rhomaleosaurus
Kronosaurus

Plesiosaurs:

Plesiosaurus
Elasmosaurus
Mauisaurus
Umoonasaurus

Fish:

Leedsichthys
Dunkleosteus
Hybodus
Orthacanthus
Megalodon
Gillicus
Hyneria

Whales:

Livyatan
Basilosaurus

Mammal-like reptiles:

Dimetrodon
Estemmenosuchus


Other Reptiles:

Megalania
Tanystropheus
Scutosaurus


Amphibians:

Prionosuchus
Metoposaurus
Diplocalus
Eryops
Mastodonsaurus

Insects

Meganeura

Ungulates:

Paraceratherium
Elasmotherium
Chalicotherium
Macrauchenia
Megaloceros
Synthetoceras
Uintatherium
Arsinotherium
Coryphodon
Andrewsarchus (carnivore)

Marsupials:

Diprotodon
Thylacoleo (recently added, carnivore)
Thylacosmilus (recently added, carnivore)

Herbivorous mammals:

Aepycamelus
Megatherium
Moeritherium
Mastodon


Carnivores:

Smilodon
Megistotherium
Sarkastodon

Entelodonts

Archaeotherium
Entelodon


Birds

Kelenken
Phorusrhacos
























InGen Island File: Isla Grande
It took me some time, but I finally managed to write about one of my fan made islands which I came up with as part of my Jurassic Park Natureverse.

What can I say?, I have a huge imagination for this stuff. I know it's not that interesting, but I did my best.

I'll be writing more animal profiles too, but not as much as I usually do.

Jurassic Park/World , InGen and Masrani Global Corporation belong to Universal Studios.
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Hey everyone, MegaSpinosaur here with a new journal entry centering around my own theories about one of history's most successful of all ancient creatures, the dinosaurs.

As the title says, I'll be talking about one of the most controversial subjects regarding dinosaurs.

Their intelligence.

For so many years as I grew up researching dinosaurs, one thing that tended to attract my attention was people and certain television programs always downplaying the intellectual capacity of dinosaurs. One matter that really threw me for a loop was how dinosaurs were always being referred to as stupid, and I admit that such a matter is based mainly on one's perception of dinosaurs.

In my opinion, the key thing to point out is that dinosaurs were never stupid like most people think they are. What needs to be remembered is that dinosaurs were primitive animals who acted on instinct, not on smarts. Animals today often do that, including domesticated pets such as dogs and cats.

You can't judge a dinosaur's intelligence based on fossilized bones or their portrayals in modern day media, it doesn't work that way. CT scans of a dinosaur brain vaults are the only way to go about this.



What you see here is the fossilized brain vault of the Late Cretaceous theropod known as Tyrannosaurus rex. The portion on the left represents it's olfactory bulbs, which are what granted the animal it's sense of smell. The portion on the right is where the dinosaur's brain would be. Studies of this fossilized material show that Tyrannosaurus had a limited degree of intelligence, something which would help it in the long run when hunting specific prey. 

But just because dinosaurs have limited intelligence, it does not mean they're stupid, it just means intelligence wasn't a major factor during the prehistoric age. Herbivorous dinosaurs themselves are no exception, sure most media portrays them as being susceptible to predation by carnivores, which is so not the case in reality. Hadrosaurs weren't as defenseless as they looked despite not having horns, claws, spikes or clubs on their tails. In fact, some notable ones such as Edmontosaurus, being big and heavy set herbivores, would have had enough intelligence to at least try defending themselves and their young against predators rather than run away at the sight of them. While there is no evidence to support this, it is possible.

The mid-sized tyrannosaur, Albertosaurus, who existed before Tyrannosaurus, was known to have preyed on Edmontosaurus, though it's most likely that it would "think" to avoid healthy adults and instead focus on hunting old, sick or young targets. 

Stegosaurs have always been referred to as being stupid dinosaurs because of their small brains, but quite frankly I don't think that is the case. Sure they weren't all that smart, but they didn't need to be smart to fend off the predators they coexisted with since they had evolved to stand and fight, which is where their spiked tails, called "thagomizers", come in handy. 

Sauropods are nowhere near invulnerable to being called stupid since their massive bodies and small heads betray that. True they weren't smart either, but their size gives them an edge against predators.

Ceratopsians and ankylosaurs would definitely have had enough thought in their brains to defend themselves with their naturally evolved weapons.

Bottom line, it's not about how smart a dinosaur is, it's about how they act based on their instincts.

In the case with carnivorous dinosaurs, the notable thing about them is that they, like modern predators, only need to be as smart as their prey.

One common misconception is that raptors were thought to be the smartest carnivores because of how they supposedly hunted in packs, a notion which stemmed from the portrayal of Velociraptor in the Jurassic Park franchise. In the franchise, paleontologist Alan Grant theorized Velociraptors to be as smart as dolphins to the point where they use problem solving methods. However, that's just movie logic. In real life, raptors were only as intelligent as their chosen niches had demonstrated. When alone, they hunt small mammals and reptiles because they have more access to them. Packs on the other hand, while not as tight knit as those seen in the movies, would rely on their numbers to get the drop on bigger prey.

Now with bigger predators like Allosaurus and Tyrannosaurus, they too also needed to be as smart as the prey they hunted. In the case with Allosaurus, it clearly had the advantage of speed when it came to chasing down certain prey items like Camptosaurus, however, it couldn't last very long and would tire out after a few minutes. Instead, ambush is the best asset that Allosaurus can think of since ambush allows it to use less energy than it would use in a chase. Group/mob hunting is also plausible when it comes to tackling prey like large sauropods, a feat which a lone individual could never pull off.

Tyrannosaurus on the other hand actually had a reason to be a smart hunter. In it's time and place, Tyrannosaurus coexisted alongside dinosaurs such as the famous Triceratops, Ankylosaurus and Edmontosaurus, along with the sauropod Alamosaurus, all of which possessed defenses that they could use to fight it off. To this end, it would need to formulate strategies that would allow it to get the better of it's prey. Ambush is a preferred method, but there could also be cases where Tyrannosaurus worked in pairs or family groups to take down their prey of choice. 

Modern animals such as Lions, hyenas and wild dogs rely on the numbers of their packs to bring down large prey. Of course, comparing modern predator intelligence to that of theropod predators doesn't do wonders.

The small theropod Troodon has often been thought to be the smartest dinosaur due to it's relatively large brain. However, it's possible that Troodon could only have been as smart as modern birds rather than mammals like chimps and dolphins.

Throughout the Mesozoic, competition was a major issue for the carnivores who coexisted with one another. A prominent example of intelligence in that department is that the predators would generally avoid each other by occupying different niches. Spinosaurs restricted themselves mainly to hunting fish, while Carcharodontosaurs focused on land based prey including sauropods, thus making competition less likely.

Large tyrannosaurs in Asia and North America would mostly go unchallenged since they were apex predators of their ecosystems. For example, in between the Campanian stage of the Late Cretaceous, the two similar sized tyrannosaurs Gorgosaurus and Daspletosaurus were known to have coexisted, but competition was never a big issue for them since they presumably occupied separate niches. The faster and lighter Gorgosaurus would have focused on hunting hadrosaurs while the more muscular and strong Daspletosaurus would primarily have hunted tougher prey such as ceratopsians.

Similarly, in Asia, the large tyrannosaurid Tarbosaurus had coexisted with the smaller and lighter Alioramus. Intelligence-wise, Alioramus would have stayed away from Tarbosaurus, keeping itself out of direct competition by hunting smaller prey.

I'm no paleontologist, but I often tend to think like one, especially one who has more sense in wanting to piece things together before coming to conclusions, unlike the real experts. I'm not saying they can't do their jobs right, I'm just saying that they should try doing some more fossil hunting and analysis before making their assumptions.

To be clear, dinosaurs were "intelligent" in their own ways. But since they were "primitive", they displayed it through "instinct".


Well, that's all for this journal. I'm sure most of this won't make any sense, I just wanted to get my opinion across.
InGen Carnivore Profile:

Abelisaurus

Dc Card Abeli Big by MegaSpinosaur

Name Meaning: Abel's Lizard

Nickname: Abel

Timeline: Late Cretaceous (80 mya)

Diet: Carnivore

Family:  Averostra, Ceratosauria, Abelisauria, Abelisauridae, Carnotaurinae

Length: 24.3 feet long

Height: 7 feet tall

Weight: 2 tons

Range: Isla Muerta

Description

Next to the more popular and recognizable Carnotaurus, Abelisaurus makes it mark as one of InGen's largest Abelisaurs. While it isn't the biggest predator, it still earns itself a spot in Muerta's food chain as one of the island's top predators, as well as one of the most active in open fields. It hunts just about anything that moves, including sauropods, ornithopods and whatever it can catch.


Habitat

Abelisaurus can most commonly be found scouting through the open plains, but will often travel to beaches and up to the valleys to seek out prey however it can. 


Behavior

Abelisaurus are very aggressive and territorial carnivores, charging at whatever they perceive as a threat. Though normally solitary like most large predators, Abelisaurus can sometimes be seen hunting and living together in packs. However, conflict among the groups during feeding can occur. 

In the mating season, males will challenge each other for the attention of females. Though the fights are fierce, they are not quite that brutal as the males merely bite and shove one another, with the only casualties being the body and facial scars left behind. 

After mating, males will stay around and help the females raise their young when they hatch. Youngsters are dependent on their parents for about a few years until they reach adolescence.


Hunting

Abelisaurus is a generalist carnivore that hunts a wide selection of prey on Muerta. While nowhere near as fast as the famously agile Carnotaurus, it can still manage quite well in running after it's prey. In typical theropod fashion, it relies primarily on it's jaws to subdue it's victims with well placed bites.

The most favored prey of Abelisaurus consists mainly of sauropods, with common targets including Saltasaurus, Antarctosaurus, Bellusaurus, Magyarosaurus, Dicraeosaurus, Austrosaurus, Ampelosaurus, Cetiosaurus and Rhoetosaurus. 

Depending on availability, Abelisaurus will even target ornithopods of small to large sizes. While Dryosaurus and Thescelosaurus are the most commonly taken prey, other prey items consist of Rhabdodon, Telmatosaurus, Fukuisaurus, Camptosaurus, Tenontosaurus, Ouranosaurus, Bactrosaurus, Maiasaura, Gilmoreosaurus, Iguanodon, Gryposaurus and Brachylophosaurus.

Based on some sightings, packs of Abelisaurus have also been seen attacking stegosaurs and ceratopsians on minimal occasions.


Interspecific Competition

Abelisaurus thrives as one of Isla Muerta's successful apex predators, which stems primarily from the absence of large Tyrannosaurs, Spinosaurs and Carnosaurs.

Other predators it shares the island with include neovenatorid Deltadromeus, tyrannosauroid Dryptosaurus, cousins Ceratosaurus, Aucasaurus, Rajasaurus, Majungasaurus and Rugops, basal saurischian Herrerasaurus, dromaeosaurid Deinonychus, megalosauroid Piatnitzkysaurus, synapsids Dimetrodon and Ophiacodon, pseudosuchian Ornithosuchus, and rauisuchians Postosuchus and Prestosuchus.

Abelisaurus is more than able to dominate the smaller predators such as Deinonychus and Piatnitzkysaurus, often stealing their kills and even scaring them off of dead animals that died from natural causes. While solitary individuals of both theropods immediately yield to the larger theropod, packs of Piatnitzkysaurus can sometimes fend one off through the use of mobbing. Dimetrodon and Ornithosuchus avoid it at all costs, while Postosuchus and Prestosuchus will simply feed off the leftovers of it's kills, along with harassing some juveniles. 

Ceratosaurus nasicornis will typically give Abelisaurus a wide berth, though C.dentisulcatus has been known to actively challenge an Abelisaurus for territorial and feeding rights. Sightings have shown that Aucasaurus, Rajasaurus and Majungasaurus instinctive avoid areas frequented by their larger cousin, while Rugops, being used to scavenging, will follow Abelisaurus from afar, hoping to gain a free meal.

With the other two apex predators Deltadromeus and Dryptosaurus, competition is less likely to occur on a regular basis. This is due in part to their preferred habitats and hunting grounds. Deltadromeus is more accustomed to hunting on Muerta's game trails and meets very little to no competition while Dryptosaurus sticks to prowling on the grasslands, with it's only known competition being Herrerasaurus. 

The synapsid Ophiacodon stays away from Abelisaurus altogether by hunting and scavenging within the dense forests.

InGen Carnivore Profile: Abelisaurus
Behold, Abelisaurus, the surprisingly lesser known member of the family that was named after it. People could take a look at this dinosaur right now and not recognize it by name, only by it's family relation to Carnotaurus, Aucasaurus and Majungasaurus, three Abelisaurs that have become known through their appearances in modern day media, notably documentaries, and in the Carnotaur's case, Disney's Dinosaur where it was inaccurately portrayed as a powerful, T.rex sized predator.

Anyway, I'll be continuing to make some profiles. While I will be taking a break to do other things such as actually write stories featuring the very animals I make profiles about, I'll still talk about more of them when I have time.

Until then, later everyone.

Jurassic Park/World and InGen belong to Universal Studios.
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InGen Carnivore Profile:

Coelophysis



Untitled by MegaSpinosaur

Name Meaning: Hollow Form

Nickname: Coelo

Timeline:  Late Triassic-Early Jurassic (203-196 mya)

Diet: Carnivore/Insectivore

Family: Neotheropoda, Coelophysidae

Length: 10 feet long

Height: 4 feet tall

Weight: 44 lbs

Range: Isla Sorna

Description

One of if not the most successful species of theropods to ever live, managing to make it all the way from the Late Triassic to the Early Jurassic. Coelophysis may be small and primitive, but one should not immediately judge this dinosaur by it's appearance, for it's behavior is what many should be mindful of. Not only are Coelophysis violent when feeling threatened, but in groups, they can even fend off predators such as raptors with limited effort.


Habitat

Coelophysis lives in the North region of Isla Sorna, being found more commonly around the sandy beaches and in some forests. However, during dry seasons they travel inland to open areas for carrion.


Behavior

Coelophysis has been seen living in groups ranging from 10 to 20 to almost 60 individuals or more. However, unlike raptors and Troodon, there is not always an established hierarchy within these groups . Simply put, most large groups consist entirely of random males and females looking around for food. But on the other hand, solitary individuals are not uncommon. In group feedings, conflicts can break out as each member aims to eat the best parts of a carcass. 

They are also wary of and often aggressive to humans, including observers who get too close for their comfort, especially when their young are with them.


Hunting

Coelophysis are opportunistic carnivores, immediately taking whatever chance they have to obtain a meal. Given their small size and slender build, Coelophysis are fast and agile runners, rivaling some raptors in speed.

When alone, Coelophysis subsist mainly on a diet of smaller creatures like insects, lizards and some small mammals. But on occasion, they will even raid the nests of other dinosaurs and devour their young when given the chance. However, they are not above hunting smaller dinosaurs, including Orodromeus, Othnielia, Hypsilophodon, Parksosaurus, Drinker, Agilisaurus and Abrictosaurus. 

Groups of Coelophysis have been sighted hunting bigger prey, with their main targets being Fukuisaurus, Camptosaurus, Bactrosaurus, Tenontosaurus, Ouranosaurus, Brachylophosaurus, Gilmoreosaurus, Gryposaurus, Hypacrosaurus, Maiasaura, Parasaurolophus, Corythosaurus, Iguanodon and Lambeosaurus. Stegosaurs and Ceratopsians are usually left alone while Ankylosaurs are completely avoided.

Coelophysis typically kill in one of three ways depending on their choice of prey. When hunting small mammals, insects and reptiles, they snap up them in their jaws and swallow them whole. With smaller dinosaurs, Coelophysis will utilize speed to run down the prey before gripping it around the throat with it's jaws to suffocate the victim. 

When attacking large prey, Coelophysis uses it's group numbers to encircle their target, followed by swarming over the prey, inflicting numerous bites and scratches until the victim dies from exhaustion and blood loss.

However, like with most carnivores, Coelophysis will immediately settle for scavenging off whatever carcasses they find. In fact, sightings have deduced that Coelophysis have at least 80% more success with scavenging than hunting, especially in dry seasons where they travel inland in search of free meals.


Interspecific Competition

Coelophysis rarely meets competition in general due to mostly staying on the beaches and in the forests. But despite this, they are not entirely unopposed by other carnivores. 

To date, it's only known competition on the beach is the mid-sized Megalosaurid, Eustreptospondylus, who also occupies the area. The two species constantly compete for whatever carrion is found, with several sightings of Eustreptospondylus actively intimidating small groups away from carcasses while big groups would resort to mobbing the larger theropod until it retreats.

The smaller theropod Compsognathus can often be found sometimes eating carrion alongside Coelophysis. In a general sense, Coelophysis will usually chase off Compys when they become agitated by their continued presence, along with occasionally preying on them. 

Sightings of Velociraptor and Coelophysis competing have become common as of 2017. Indeed, confrontations over carrion come as no surprise. But in most cases, it is Velociraptor that is often driven off by Coelophysis due to said theropod relying on their group numbers to gain an edge. Similar encounters involving Deinonychus and Coelophysis have also been mentioned and sighted.

When encountering larger and more deadly predators, Coelophysis instinctively steers clear of them at all costs. Packs of Utahraptor have been known to often harass and sometimes hunt Coelophysis when regular prey becomes scarce. They are especially intimidated by giant predators such as Tyrannosaurus, Giganotosaurus, Spinosaurus, Acrocanthosaurus, Allosaurus and even Carcharodontosaurus.
InGen Carnivore Profile: Coelophysis
This dinosaur left a lasting impression on me when I first saw it in the Walking With Dinosaurs documentary series. Learning that this dinosaur was one of the earliest theropods to ever exist is absolutely amazing.

It would later go on to appear in the documentary When Dinosaurs Roamed America, where it once again appears as the first theropod introduced in the program.

Now then, be sure to tune in for the next profile, which is once again anonymous.

Jurassic Park/World and InGen belong exclusively to Universal Studios.
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InGen Carnivore Profile:

Alioramus

Dc Card Alior Big by MegaSpinosaur

Name Meaning: Different Branch

Nickname: Alio

Timeline: Late Cretaceous (70 mya)

Diet: Carnivore

Family: Orionides, Avetheropoda, Coelurosauria,Tyrannosauroidea, Tyrannosauridae, Tyrannosaurinae, Alioramini

Length: 20 feet long

Height: 7 feet tall

Weight: 1 ton

Range: Isla Tacano, Isla Grande

Description

Alioramus may be smaller and lesser known than it's more bigger cousins, but there's more to this theropod than meets the eye. It's gracile build gives it an edge in pursuing smaller and faster prey over long distances, with it's speed also providing a means of escape from bigger predators. The type species, A.remotus thrives on Isla Tacano while the other species A.altai thrives on Isla Grande.


Habitat

On Tacano, Alioramus commonly resides in the upland and mountain environments, but sometimes ventures out into the more open areas at night. The Alioramus specimens on Grande do still live around mountainous areas, but can also be found wandering through badlands, grasslands and around watering holes. They will even travel along beaches and coasts for carrion.


Behavior

Compared to tyrannosaurids like Tyrannosaurus or Daspletosaurus, Alioramus is not quite as aggressive at first glance, but can be seriously violent when provoked or when their offspring are threatened. Fights over territory have been known to occur between males from time to time.

Alioramus can also be semi-social, with some individuals being seen in packs consisting of 2, 3 or four individuals. During the mating season, males and females pair up for life and will defend their young at all costs from any threat.

While they aren't known for man-eating, reports of humans being mauled to death by aggressive Alioramus have been filed.


Hunting

Much like the modern day predator known as the Cheetah, Alioramus is a hunter who is best adapted for speed. This enables it to catch and bring down most prey that can easily outrun larger predators. Though it's lacks the bone crushing jaw power of T.Rex, it's bite is still more than enough to subdue it's prey with limited effort.

Being a mid-sized predator, Alioramus more traditionally hunts small to mid-sized herbivores. Favored targets include Protoceratops, Thescelosaurus, Homalocephale, Dryosaurus, Valdosaurus, Ornithomimus, Struthiomimus, Dromiceiomimus, Leptoceratops, Montanoceratops, Pachycephalosaurus, Telmatosaurus, Fukuisaurus, Atlascopcosaurus, Camptosaurus, Bactrosaurus, Rhabdodon and Mussaurus. Oviraptorids are also hunted, but only rarely. In addition, the synapsid Estemmenosuchus is preyed on as well.

In packs, Alioramus will often target other herbivores such as Gilmoreosaurus, Maiasaura, Hypacrosaurus, Muttaburrasaurus, Lurdusaurus, Gryposaurus, Achelousaurus, Anchiceratops, Stegosaurus, Chasmosaurus, Centrosaurus, Einiosaurus, juvenile sauropods and occasionally young Iguanodon.

In the case with the Alioramus population on Grande, next to hunting dinosaurs, they will also prey on mammals such as Macrauchenia, Megaloceros, Moeritherium, Synthetoceras, Aepycamelus and Coryphodon, along with working in packs to hunt Uintatherium, Arsinotherium, Mastodon, Chalicotherium, Diprotodon and juvenile specimens of Paraceratherium and Elasmotherium. On occasion, packs have also been stalking and attacking the giant sloth Megatherium, often targeting old, sick and injured individuals.


Interspecific Competition

Although successful as predators of their own niche, Alioramus must constantly be on the lookout for competition from the other predators they share their ecosystems with.

On Isla Tacano, A.remotus more frequently encounters competition from the likes of the large megalosaurid, Torvosaurus gurneyi, with whom it shares the uplands. While most solitary individuals will typically lose kills, packs may sometimes stand their ground against Torvosaurus in an attempt to fend it off.

The two Allosaur species A.lucasi and A.europaeus are also seen as being serious threats to Alioramus, who avoids them by hunting at night. However, simultaneously, some Alioramus have been spotted harassing juvenile Allosaurs to steal their food.

Regarding it's interactions with Tarbosaurus and Daspletosaurus, Alioramus is usually tolerated by them for a time, with both tyrannosaurs even allowing it into their territories. But despite this, they do seek to stay away from their larger cousins when their presence is no longer allowed. 

Over in the mountainous, canyon-like habitats of Tacano, Alioramus is sympatric with the more aggressive Tyrannosaurus "Canyon" Rex. Instinctively, the smaller tyrannosaur usually gives the Canyon Rex a wide berth and instead coexists by hunting smaller prey, though it will actively defend it's young from a marauding Canyon Rex.

Over on Isla Grande, A.altai deals with a large variety of competition from both dinosaurs and other carnivorous animals. It avoids most of the bigger predators while simultaneously contending with smaller or similar sized ones.

 Predators such as Sarkastodon, Marshosaurus and Fukuiraptor are mindful of Alioramus and prefer to avoid them. Smilodon, Megistotherium and even Prestosuchus will sometimes challenge a lone Alioramus at a carcass, though Entelodon and Andrewsarchus choose to stand by and wait until Alioramus has finished eating. In contrast, Alioramus will steer away from confrontations with the giant lizard Megalania, thus avoiding it's deadly bite and whipping tail, though parents will bravely face one in a bid to protect their young while packs will mob one to steal it's kill. 

Amazingly, this theropod also appears to be on somewhat social terms with it's fellow Tyrannosaurids Gorgosaurus and Alectrosaurus, though they are very cautious around Tyrannosaurus, the island's top predator, and Dryptosaurus, both of whom will attack Alioramus if territorial or hungry.

The theropods Rapator and Suchomimus will readily steal kills from Alioramus, while others such as Eustreptospondylus and Siamotyrannus will fight one for feeding rights. Strangely, the terror birds Kelenken and Phorusrhacos both seem to ignore Alioramus, with Alioramus doing the same in return. 
InGen Carnivore Profile: Alioramus
A poorly known tyrannosaurid that has yet to be seen in any documentaries as of this year. This theropod was known to have coexisted alongside the much bigger and more known Asian tyrannosaur, Tarbosaurus. It's upsetting to see so many interesting dinosaurs being put to shame by remaining almost unknown to most people of the modern world.

Anyway, be on the look out for some more profiles.

And keep in mind that the stuff written on these profiles such as the habitat, behavior, competition, etc is all fan made and not meant to be taken seriously. Their name meanings, size, height, weight, diet, family and timelines are based on real life research.

I just wanted to clear that up.

Tune in next time for another profile.

Jurassic Park/World and InGen all belong to Universal Studios.
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InGen Carnivore Profile:

Hyaenodon

Untitled by MegaSpinosaur


Name Meaning: Hyena Tooth

Nickname: Razor Jaws

Timeline: Late Eocene to Early Miocene (42-15.9 mya)

Diet: Carnivore

Family: Creodonta, Hyaenodonta, Hyaenodontidae

Length: 10 feet long

Height: 100 cm tall at the shoulder

Weight: 1,100 lbs

Range: Isla Pena

Description

Despite the meaning that it's name represents, Hyaenodon should not be mistaken for a primitive hyena nor should it be considered a cousin of hyenas themselves. What gave the creature it's name are it's teeth, which can deliver quite a nasty bite to anyone unfortunate enough to encounter one. The largest species, H.gigas, is truly as deadly as observers say it is. While not the biggest predator on Isla Pena, it certainly does well as an effective hunter, relying on the traditional method ambush to bring down it's prey.


Habitat

Hyaenodon preferably prowls around the shrublands and watering holes, where it uses the cover of the the shrubs and vegetation to set up ambushes. But during dawn and nighttime, Hyaenodon will go hunting out on the steppes for more prey.


Behavior

Based on live observation, Hyaenodon is known to be extremely aggressive. They view almost every other carnivore as a potential threat and will not hesitate to attack, with only a few exceptions. Males have been seen as being incredibly dangerous, especially to each other, though females are known to be just as violent when defending their young.

Outside of parenting, Hyaenodon is a largely solitary predator who does not hunt in packs, though rumors of four males hunting together as a coalition have been mentioned.

Hyaenodon is also a willing man-eater, with at least 22 human deaths being reported on Isla Pena.


Hunting

Hyaenodon is a ambush predator, relying on the use of stealth and cover to take it's prey by surprise before moving in for the kill. As a quadrupedal animal, Hyaenodon is a fast runner, being able to run down most of the prey that it hunts. Once it catches the prey, it then uses it's powerful jaws to finish off the victim with a direct bite to the neck.

Hyaenodon primarily hunts animals smaller than itself or closer to it's size. Commonly hunted prey consists of both mammals and dinosaurs. Such targets include Dryosaurus, Synthetoceras, Aepycamelus, Thescelosaurus, Valdosaurus, Psittacosaurus, Protoceratops, and Leptoceratops, along with the juveniles of Paraceratherium, Chalicotherium, Macrauchenia, Arsinotherium, Uintatherium, Hadrosaurs, Iguanodon and Ouranosaurus. In contrast, they will not bother with Stegosaurs or large ceratopsians due to their armed defenses, though they will sometimes attack Pachycephalosaurus.

As with typical predator behavior, Hyaenodon is no stranger to scavenging.



Interspecific Competition


Although a successful predator in it's own right, Hyaenodon is unfortunately cast aside as the underdog due to constant competition with other more deadly predators on Pena.

It's most common enemies are usually the bear-dog Amphicyon and the pig-like entelodont, Daeodon. Both mammals rival it in size and ferocity, making them more than capable of challenging it for carcasses. However, Hyaenodon will not hesitate to attack and kill young individuals of both animals to get rid of competition.

The bigger and closely related Megistotherium is also known to challenge Hyaenodon for feeding rights on a carcass, mainly when their hunting grounds sometimes overlap, otherwise they usually avoid each other.

However, it is the island's large theropod predators that Hyaenodon is cautious about. Carnotaurus and Metriacanthosaurus have been spotted scaring Hyaenodon away from freshly made kills, along with even killing individuals that fail to escape in time. But it is quick to immediately flee to safety when confronted by Bahariasaurus and Pena's apex predator, Saurophaganax.

InGen Carnivore Profile: Hyaenodon
Well, I must say that it's about time I got around to writing about one of prehistory's most uniquely evolved predators of the Cenozoic, reigning as top predator for a while until the Miocene period in which it was outcompeted and ultimately replaced by the more advanced Amphicyon. 

I first learned about this predator when I watched Walking with Beasts a long time ago as a kid, where it depicted Hyaenodon as a predator in Mexico,Arizona who supposedly preys on Indricotheres, which was demonstrated by a pair of them attempting and failing to attack a newborn calf since it was being protected by it's mother. Later on, a single individual ambushes and successfully kills a Chalicotherium, only to be suddenly driven off by a gang of Entelodon. Then we get another scene where Hyaenodon is seen chasing down a lone Entelodon during a rainstorm, only to lose it halfway.

Years later, it reappeared in a documentary series Prehistoric Predators, first appearing in the episode "Killer Pig" as a rival of the entelodont Archaeotherium before showing up as the central focus of it's own episode "Razor Jaws", which depicts it's role as apex predator of North America and how it eventually died out.

Anyway, this is my first official profile about a prehistoric mammal. I'm planning on doing some more dinosaurs, along with some mammals, reptiles, etc.

Tune in next time.

Jurassic Park/World and InGen belong to Universal Studios.
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On Thursday July 20th, 2017, the lead singer of Linkin Park, Chester Bennington, had died due to suicide by hanging. His death really shocked me to the core when I found out later in the evening on that day. And I have to say, some of the songs that he and the band had made over the years such as Iridescent, New Divide, A Light That Never Comes, and Until It's Gone are my most favorite songs of all time. 

This journal is dedicated to him.

Farewell and Rest in Peace, Chester Bennington. You shall be missed by many fans, including me.

And to honor him, I use this song:

InGen Carnivore Profile:

Majungasaurus


Untitled by MegaSpinosaur

Name Meaning: Majunga Dome

Nickname: Majunga

Timeline:  Late Cretaceous (70-66 mya)

Diet: Carnivore

Family: Averostra, Ceratosauria, Abelisauria, Abelisauridae, Majungasaurinae

Length: 23 feet long, 26 foot specimens have been rumored, but never seen

Height:  6 feet tall

Weight: 2,400 pounds

Range: Isla Muerta

Description

This mid-sized abelisaur may not be as popular or beloved as it's more famous cousin Carnotaurus, but it certainly doesn't go unnoticed by observers. What it lacks in speed and agility, it more than makes up for with jaw power. Living on Isla Muerta, it can be found hunting prey slower than itself, with sauropods being it's most favorite victims.

Habitat

Majungasaurus preferably ventures through Muerta's coniferous forests during the day, but can also be spotted sleeping in caves during the night unless hungry. When hunting, Majungasaurus will naturally travel up to Muerta's plains and valleys to seek out potential prey.



Behavior

Compared to some abelisaurs, Majungasaurus is strongly solitary outside of mating season and parenting. They are seen to be extremely aggressive and deadly when provoked, with males having been known attack other theropods who enter their territory, regardless of size.

Mothers will watch over their young for the first few years, providing them with plenty of protection and food.

However, what makes Majungasaurus stand out from it's other abelisaur cousins is it's willingness for cannibalism. In fact, during times where prey becomes scarce, Majungasaurus seems to have no qualms about actively feeding off the carcasses of other Majungasaurs who have either died from natural causes or were killed by other dinosaurs.


Hunting

According to study and observation, Majungasaurus is a specialist predator. Given it's short and stocky legs, it is not properly built for pursuing prey over long distances. To this end, as stated above, Majungasaurus instead prefers to hunt slower prey. When going in for the kill, Majungasaurus will use it's strong jaws to bite into the neck of the prey, maintaining it's grip until the victim is brought down.

Like with most abelisaurs, Majungasaurus mainly prefers hunting Sauropods. Common targets include Bellusaurus, Magyarosaurus, Saltasaurus, Rhoetosaurus, and Ampelosaurus. Juvenile ceratopsians and stegosaurs are also targeted from time to time. Ornithopods such as Camptosaurus, Bactrosaurus, Fukuisaurus, Muttaburrasaurus and Ouranosaurus will sometimes be hunted, primarily through ambush. 

While they seem to be prone to cannibalizing their own kind, Majungasaurs are not above scavenging off of other animals.


Interspecific Competition

Despite it's preferred niche, Majungasaurus must constantly compete for food with other carnivores of all sizes on Muerta.

As with some modern predators, Majungasaurus will commonly use it's size and intimidation to scare smaller predators away from carcasses. They more than easily establish dominance over the likes of Deinonychus, Piatnitzkysaurus, Dimetrodon and Ornithosuchus. However, packs of Piatnitzkysaurus have been known to actively fend off Majungasaurs through the use of mobbing.

Interestingly, Majungasaurus appears to be somewhat tolerable of it's fellow cousins Rajasaurus, Aucasaurus and Rugops, going so far as to even feed alongside them on carcasses more than once. However, the same tolerance cannot be said for it's equally big cousin Abelisaurus, whom it instinctively avoids. 

Similarly, Ceratosaurus and Majungasaurus have a neutral relationship, in which neither will attack each other regardless of whether food is the main focus. InGen scientists have theorized that the resulting behavior could be due to both theropods sharing a common ancestor since Majungasaurus and all other abelisaurs are actually ceratosaurs themselves. 

The rauisuchian Postosuchus is seen to occasionally challenge a Majungasaurus for carcasses and will sometimes even prey on young Majungasaurs.

Regarding the other predators, Deltadromeus, Dryptosaurus and Herrerasaurus are never seen to actively compete with Majungasaurus due to their hunting ranges being so far apart.
InGen Carnivore Profile: Majungasaurus
And here it is, Majungasaurus.  Interesting thing is I didn't find out about this dinosaur until I watched the first episode of Jurassic Fight Club in 2008. Then later it made appearances in two 2011 documentaries called Planet Dinosaur and Dinosaur Revolution, the former in which it's habit of cannibalism was shown when a female Majungasaurus attacked and killed a male after he stole some food from one of her offspring, then she and her young proceeded to eat the male, while in the latter series a Majungasaurus was depicted attacking and eventually killing a sauropod called Rapetosaurus.

I should have thought of writing these profiles years ago. XD

But rest assured, I still got plans for more. And from now on, I'm gonna keep all future profiles anonymous in order to try building up the hype. Plus, at some point I'll take a shot at explaining about my fan made island called Isla Grande.

Jurassic Park/World and InGen belong to Universal Studios.
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InGen Carnivore Profile:

Monolophosaurus

Untitled by MegaSpinosaur

Name Meaning: Single Crested Lizard

Nickname: Monolo

Timeline: Middle Jurassic (165 mya)

Diet: Carnivore

Family: Neotheropoda, Averostra, Tetanurae

Length: 18 feet long

Height: 6 feet tall

Weight: 475 kg

Range: Isla Sorna

Description

People who see this theropod walking around from afar may sometimes mistake it for Dilophosaurus due to it's similar looking crest. But try to get closer and you may wind up seeing the difference before it runs away or attacks you. Despite the slight resemblance, there is enough distinction between Dilophosaurus and Monolophosaurus to further classify them as being unrelated. In regards to it's behavior, it can be aggressive when threatened, hungry or startled.


Habitat

Monolophosaurus lives in the North region of Isla Sorna, thriving within the lush jungles and on the savannas of said region.


Behavior

Monolophosaurus is mostly a solitary hunter, but can sometimes be seen hunting in pairs on certain occasions, with siblings hunting together for life. They are aggressive to intruders and will attack whatever animal that crosses into their territory. In the mating season, females choose their mates based on the size of their crests. The male with the largest crest earns the right to mate, but if there are two males with the same sized crest, they will fight each other for mating rights, with the loser being driven away.

Females make their nests under the shades of trees and will protect their young once they hatch. Males rarely help raise the young, but at least two rare sightings of both parents caring for their babies have been reported.

Regarding their interaction with humans, Monolophosaurs are known to attack them if provoked. However, they will not eat the humans they kill unless they are desperate for food.


Hunting

As a lightweight predator, Monolophosaurus is a fast and agile runner. It can chase down prey over long distances. Upon catching up, it will then leap onto the prey, using it's claws and teeth to subdue it.

Monolophosaurus commonly preys on herbivores smaller than itself, but will even take prey bigger than itself. Preferred targets include Dryosaurus, Thescelosaurus, Valdosaurus, Hypsilophodon and Atlascopcosaurus. Other targets include the prosauropods Massospondylus, Lufengosaurus, Blikanasaurus, Plateosaurus gracilis, Yunnanosaurus and Mussaurus. Monolophosaurus will not hunt adult Therizinosaurus, Plateosaurus engelhardti or Euskelosaurus due to these herbivores being too big and dangerous, though juveniles are hunted instead.

On the other hand, Monolophosaurus can also scavenge when necessary. 


Interspecific Competition

Dilophosaurus and Monolophosaurus often target the same prey in areas where their hunting ranges overlap. Though they relatively avoid each other when food is not the case, reports of territorial disputes have been filed recently. According to observers, while Monlophosaurus is more likely to challenge Dilophosaurus for feeding rights over carcasses from time to time, there are some cases of Dilophosaurs actively stealing kills from Monolophosaurs. Young Dilophosaurs often face the threat of being attacked by adult Monolophosaurus, who conduct such attacks to eliminate future competition.

Liliensternus rarely ever competes with Monolophosaurus, preferring instead to take smaller prey all the while staying out of range when Monolophosaurus is active. Gasosaurus similarly avoids coming into conflict with this theropod by simply feeding off the leftovers of it's kills.

The megalosaurid Afrovenator, being the largest predator of the savannas, has been known to occasionally steal food from Monolophosaurus anytime the chance arises. Monlophosaurus is usually quick to make a hasty retreat, staying out of direct conflict by engaging in niche differentiation, during which it exclusively tackles smaller prey.
InGen Carnivore Profile: Monolophosaurus
Well there you have it, Monolophosaurus, another primitive theropod from the Jurassic period. Yet again we have another dinosaur who gets overlooked by the fossil record and the media.

Along with continuing with carnivore profiles, I'll try my best to start working on profiles for herbivores too. Plus, I'll be expanding my prehistoric knowledge by making profiles for some reptiles, mammals, amphibians, fish and birds. I can't promise I'll get them all, but I will get some of them.

Next profile is once again anonymous. 

Jurassic Park/World and InGen belong to Universal Studios.
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MegaSpinosaur
Malik Hayes
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I'm no good with drawing or designing art, but I am a good fan story author. Originally I didn't believe in making stories, but I had so many ideas in my head that I just to let them out in the open. I am a huge fan of Marvel Comics, and I like heroes such as Spider-Man, Iron Man, Hulk, Wolverine, Thor, Captain America and the Thing.

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Hey everyone, MegaSpinosaur here with a new journal entry centering around my own theories about one of history's most successful of all ancient creatures, the dinosaurs.

As the title says, I'll be talking about one of the most controversial subjects regarding dinosaurs.

Their intelligence.

For so many years as I grew up researching dinosaurs, one thing that tended to attract my attention was people and certain television programs always downplaying the intellectual capacity of dinosaurs. One matter that really threw me for a loop was how dinosaurs were always being referred to as stupid, and I admit that such a matter is based mainly on one's perception of dinosaurs.

In my opinion, the key thing to point out is that dinosaurs were never stupid like most people think they are. What needs to be remembered is that dinosaurs were primitive animals who acted on instinct, not on smarts. Animals today often do that, including domesticated pets such as dogs and cats.

You can't judge a dinosaur's intelligence based on fossilized bones or their portrayals in modern day media, it doesn't work that way. CT scans of a dinosaur brain vaults are the only way to go about this.



What you see here is the fossilized brain vault of the Late Cretaceous theropod known as Tyrannosaurus rex. The portion on the left represents it's olfactory bulbs, which are what granted the animal it's sense of smell. The portion on the right is where the dinosaur's brain would be. Studies of this fossilized material show that Tyrannosaurus had a limited degree of intelligence, something which would help it in the long run when hunting specific prey. 

But just because dinosaurs have limited intelligence, it does not mean they're stupid, it just means intelligence wasn't a major factor during the prehistoric age. Herbivorous dinosaurs themselves are no exception, sure most media portrays them as being susceptible to predation by carnivores, which is so not the case in reality. Hadrosaurs weren't as defenseless as they looked despite not having horns, claws, spikes or clubs on their tails. In fact, some notable ones such as Edmontosaurus, being big and heavy set herbivores, would have had enough intelligence to at least try defending themselves and their young against predators rather than run away at the sight of them. While there is no evidence to support this, it is possible.

The mid-sized tyrannosaur, Albertosaurus, who existed before Tyrannosaurus, was known to have preyed on Edmontosaurus, though it's most likely that it would "think" to avoid healthy adults and instead focus on hunting old, sick or young targets. 

Stegosaurs have always been referred to as being stupid dinosaurs because of their small brains, but quite frankly I don't think that is the case. Sure they weren't all that smart, but they didn't need to be smart to fend off the predators they coexisted with since they had evolved to stand and fight, which is where their spiked tails, called "thagomizers", come in handy. 

Sauropods are nowhere near invulnerable to being called stupid since their massive bodies and small heads betray that. True they weren't smart either, but their size gives them an edge against predators.

Ceratopsians and ankylosaurs would definitely have had enough thought in their brains to defend themselves with their naturally evolved weapons.

Bottom line, it's not about how smart a dinosaur is, it's about how they act based on their instincts.

In the case with carnivorous dinosaurs, the notable thing about them is that they, like modern predators, only need to be as smart as their prey.

One common misconception is that raptors were thought to be the smartest carnivores because of how they supposedly hunted in packs, a notion which stemmed from the portrayal of Velociraptor in the Jurassic Park franchise. In the franchise, paleontologist Alan Grant theorized Velociraptors to be as smart as dolphins to the point where they use problem solving methods. However, that's just movie logic. In real life, raptors were only as intelligent as their chosen niches had demonstrated. When alone, they hunt small mammals and reptiles because they have more access to them. Packs on the other hand, while not as tight knit as those seen in the movies, would rely on their numbers to get the drop on bigger prey.

Now with bigger predators like Allosaurus and Tyrannosaurus, they too also needed to be as smart as the prey they hunted. In the case with Allosaurus, it clearly had the advantage of speed when it came to chasing down certain prey items like Camptosaurus, however, it couldn't last very long and would tire out after a few minutes. Instead, ambush is the best asset that Allosaurus can think of since ambush allows it to use less energy than it would use in a chase. Group/mob hunting is also plausible when it comes to tackling prey like large sauropods, a feat which a lone individual could never pull off.

Tyrannosaurus on the other hand actually had a reason to be a smart hunter. In it's time and place, Tyrannosaurus coexisted alongside dinosaurs such as the famous Triceratops, Ankylosaurus and Edmontosaurus, along with the sauropod Alamosaurus, all of which possessed defenses that they could use to fight it off. To this end, it would need to formulate strategies that would allow it to get the better of it's prey. Ambush is a preferred method, but there could also be cases where Tyrannosaurus worked in pairs or family groups to take down their prey of choice. 

Modern animals such as Lions, hyenas and wild dogs rely on the numbers of their packs to bring down large prey. Of course, comparing modern predator intelligence to that of theropod predators doesn't do wonders.

The small theropod Troodon has often been thought to be the smartest dinosaur due to it's relatively large brain. However, it's possible that Troodon could only have been as smart as modern birds rather than mammals like chimps and dolphins.

Throughout the Mesozoic, competition was a major issue for the carnivores who coexisted with one another. A prominent example of intelligence in that department is that the predators would generally avoid each other by occupying different niches. Spinosaurs restricted themselves mainly to hunting fish, while Carcharodontosaurs focused on land based prey including sauropods, thus making competition less likely.

Large tyrannosaurs in Asia and North America would mostly go unchallenged since they were apex predators of their ecosystems. For example, in between the Campanian stage of the Late Cretaceous, the two similar sized tyrannosaurs Gorgosaurus and Daspletosaurus were known to have coexisted, but competition was never a big issue for them since they presumably occupied separate niches. The faster and lighter Gorgosaurus would have focused on hunting hadrosaurs while the more muscular and strong Daspletosaurus would primarily have hunted tougher prey such as ceratopsians.

Similarly, in Asia, the large tyrannosaurid Tarbosaurus had coexisted with the smaller and lighter Alioramus. Intelligence-wise, Alioramus would have stayed away from Tarbosaurus, keeping itself out of direct competition by hunting smaller prey.

I'm no paleontologist, but I often tend to think like one, especially one who has more sense in wanting to piece things together before coming to conclusions, unlike the real experts. I'm not saying they can't do their jobs right, I'm just saying that they should try doing some more fossil hunting and analysis before making their assumptions.

To be clear, dinosaurs were "intelligent" in their own ways. But since they were "primitive", they displayed it through "instinct".


Well, that's all for this journal. I'm sure most of this won't make any sense, I just wanted to get my opinion across.

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